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Free Flight Scale Plans of Australian-designed aircraft

The plans featured on this page are all drafted using AutoDesk AutoSketch, and saved as Adobe Acrobat PDF files so you can print them out in fine detail ready to build. You can get the free Acrobat Reader from Adobe.
These plans are all available for downloading free of charge. Several (but not all) of these plans have been successfully constructed and flown. Feel free to publish any of these plans in a newsletter or magazine - just let me know first, with an e-mail to derek "at" buckmasterfamily "dot" id "dot" au

I sometimes hear from folks who have built and flown models from these plans. Click here to see some examples of their efforts.

 

 

Amethyst Falcon


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The full scale Amethyst Falcon aerobatic ultralight biplane.The Falcon is a single-place  aerobatic ultralight biplane. It was designed by Eric Whitney (with the aim that it could be built by a home-builder in a single-car garage) and the stress calculations were carried out by Bill Whitney. Two  Falcons have been constructed to date, the first by Bill Knight (shown in the photo).
Information on the Falcon was previously available at the Australian Ultralight Aviation website. It appears this website is no longer active.
Jiro Sugimotos rendition of my Peanut Scale Amethyst Falcon plan.I have presented plans in two different sizes. One plan spans 22" (559mm) and has 129 square inches of wing area. Suitable for rubber or KP-01 power. The plan prints on 6 pages.

The other is for a Peanut Scale (13" span) model. A model built from this plan has been successfully flown by Jiro Sugimoto. Details of Jiro's model can be found at the Small Flying Arts webzine.
Plan for 22" model:

PDF for A4 paper (97 KB)

PDF for Letter paper (99 KB)

Plan for Peanut Scale 330mm (13") model:

PDF for A4 paper (65 KB)

PDF for Letter paper (58 KB)


Amsco Monoplane


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The original (and only) Amsco monoplane outside the factory in Geelong.The Amsco monoplane is a rare Australian light plane developed by Percival "Perc" Pratt in Geelong in the 1930s.
My Peanut Scale model of the Amsco monoplane.The plans are drawn for a 330mm (13") span Peanut scale model for rubber power. The plan prints out on 2 sheets of A4 paper. I've flown my own model built from this plan.
Plan for 330mm (13") model:

Peanut scale plans for the Amsco monoplane
PDF for A4 paper (81 KB)

Bristol M1C (Gypsy Powered) Racer


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Horrie Miller's modified Bristol M1CThe M1C was designed by Bristol Aircraft in the UK as a WWI fighter, and two were imported to Australia by Harry Butler. One was modified for racing by Horrie Miller, with a Gypsy inline engine, and a slimmer fuselage.
Kevin Mooney's dime scale model of Miller's modified Bristol M1CThe plan is for a simplified model to the "neo Dime Scale" rules of the Flying Aces Club (FAC). Several models have been constructed from this plan, including Kevin Mooney's version, shown in the picture.
Plan for 406mm (16") model:

PDF for A4 paper (78 KB)

PDF for Letter paper (61 KB)

CAC CA-2 Wackett Trainer
(prototype version with Gypsy in-line engine)


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The prototype CA-2 WackettAs World War II loomed on the horizon, Australia needed a training aircraft to train the new generation of pilots who would soon be needed. So the Wackett was developed to meet this need. The two prototypes featured in-line Gypsy Major engines, but these turned out to be underpowered. But they still make a good subject for free flight scale model.
CAC CA-2 Wackett plan thumbnailThe plans are drawn for a 406mm (16") span "Pseudo Dime Scale" model of the Wackett prototype for rubber power. Plan prints on 2 pages.
Plan for 406mm (16") model:

PDF for A4 paper (81 KB)

PDF for Letter paper (81 KB)

CAC CA-6 Wackett Trainer
(production version with Warner Scarab radial engine)


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CA-6 Wackett A3-22 on display at the Moorabbin Air Museum. Image © Derek BuckmasterThe solution to the under-powered state of the CA-2 prototypes was to install a more powerful Gypsy 6 engine, but the supply of these engines from England was in doubt. So the Warner Scarab radial engine was finally selected as the powerplant.  In this new form, the Wackett met the requirements of the RAAF trainer specification, and 200 Wacketts were constructed and saw service with the RAAF and the Dutch East Indies Air Force (now Indonesia).
CAC CA-6 Wackett plan thumbnail. Image © Derek BuckmasterThe plans are drawn for a 406mm (16") span "Pseudo Dime Scale" model of the Wackett for rubber power. The plan prints on 2 pages.
Plan for 406mm (16") model:

PDF for A4 paper (81 KB)

PDF for Letter paper (81 KB)

CAC CA-15


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The CAC CA-15 in flightThe CA-15 was a prototype fighter developed in the closing stages of WWII. It represented the peak in piston-powered fighter performance.
I've presented plans at two different sizes (see at right), showing all formers, ribs and other templates.
Plans for 24" model:

PDF for A4 paper (146 KB) 12 pages
PDF for Letter paper
(152 KB) 12 pages

Plans for 18" (1/2" or 1:24 scale) model:

PDF for A4 paper (108 KB)
PDF for Letter paper (105 KB)

CAC CA-23 Ceres


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The Ceres was developed by CAC in the 1950's as an agricultural aircraft for top-dressing and spraying. It was a new design, but utilised some components from surplus Wirraway trainers.

It was larger and heavier than the Wirraway, but its improved aerodynamics resulted in much better handling. The pilot was seated in a raised cockpit (higher and further aft than the location of the rear seat of the Wirraway) for an improved view. The landing gear was fixed. Large slotted flaps were fitted as were fixed leading edge slats on the outboard wing panels.

CAC Ceres plan thumbnail. Image © Derek BuckmasterThe plans are drawn for a 610mm (24") span scale model of the Ceres for rubber power (prints out on 6 sheets of paper).
Plan for 610mm (24") model:

PDF for A4 paper (55 KB)

PDF for Letter paper (55 KB)

CAC CA-25 Winjeel


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CAC CA-25 Winjeel. Image © Derek BuckmasterThe Winjeel was developed in the late 40s and early 50s as an ab-initio trainer to replace the Tiger Moth in RAAF service. It continued in service into the 1980's as a forward air control aircraft.

Plan for 660mm (26") model:

PDF for A4 paper (81 KB)

PDF for Letter paper (81 KB)
The plans are drawn for a 660mm (26") span scale model of the Winjeel for rubber power or a geared KP-01 electric. Wing area is 97 sq ins. The plan prints out on 9 sheets of A4 or Letter paper. The model shown at left was built by Sidney Elliott from these plans.

Duigan 1913 Tractor Biplane


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John Duigan's 1913 tractor biplaneAfter venturing to England and working with Avro, John Duigan returned to Australia and built a second tractor biplane in his backyard in suburban Melbourne in 1913.
Here's the plan for a 635mm (25") span free flight model of Duigan's 1913 biplane powered by a KP-01 geared electric motor.
Plan for 25" model:

PDF for A4 paper (34 KB)


Gippsland Aeronautics GA-8 Airvan


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The Gipplsland Aeronautics GA-8 Airvan. Image © Derek BuckmasterThe GA-8 is an 8 passenger utility plane being developed in Australia. It recently received type certification in the USA (becoming the 7th Australian aircraft to achieve this).
GA8 Airvan model constructed by Wilton Adriano The plan is for a 560mm (22") span rubber powered model of the Airvan. Prints out on 4 pages. The model shown here is a 150% scaled version (33" span) built by Wilton Adriano.
Plans for 560mm (22") model:

PDF for A4 paper (70 KB)

PDF for Letter Paper (70 KB)


3-view drawings:

PDF for A4 paper


GAF N22 Nomad


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The Nomad is a twin engined STOL utility aircraft developed in Australia in the 1970's.
A model built from these plans by Nguyen Thanh LuanThis plan is for a 710mm (28") span rubber powered model of the Nomad N22. The plan prints out on 10 pages, showing all formers, ribs and other templates.
Plans for 28" model:

PDF for A4 paper (115 KB)

PDF for Letter paper (114 KB)


Howard Hughes Engineering Lightwing


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The Hughes Lightwing ultralight. Image © Derek BuckmasterThe Lightwing is an ultralight designed and manufactured in Australia to meet ANO 95.2.  I first saw the Lightwing at the SAAA Mangalore airshow in 1986. Its simple lines and large wing make it an ideal scale model subject.
Model of the Hughes Lightwing ultralightThis plan is available in 2 sizes: 20" span for a KP-00 or 30" span for a KP-01.
Plan for 760mm (30") model: 

PDF for A4 paper (39 KB)

Plan for 510mm (20") model:

PDF for A4 paper (25 KB)

Kingsford Smith Aviation Services KS-1 & KS-2


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Kingsford Smith Aviation Services KS-2Australia has always been one of the world's largest agricultural producers, and this has fueled the demand for agricultural aircraft. The KS.1 was a post WWII conversion of the Wackett trainer for top-dressing and spraying - by replacing the front cockpit with a hopper.
Plan of the Kingsford Smith Aviation Services KS-1. Image © Derek BuckmasterThe plan is for a ½" scale (1:24) rubber powered model of 470mm (18.5") span.
Plan for 470mm (18.5") model: 

PDF for A4 paper (99 KB, prints out on 4 sheets)

PDF for Letter paper (100 KB, prints out on 4 sheets)


3-view drawings:

PDF for A4 paper


Kingsford Smith Aviation Services KS-3
Cropmaster


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Kingsford Smith Aviation Services KS-3Following on from the KS.1 and KS.2, the KS.3 was the first production version of Kingsford Smith Aviation's Cropmaster.

The KS.3 featured the pilot in the original front seat position of the Wackett, and the rear seat was replaced with the hopper.

Plan for the Kingsford Smith Aviation Services KS-3. Image © Derek BuckmasterThe plan is for a Walnut Scale rubber powered model of 457mm (18") span.
Plan for 457mm (18") model: 

PDF for A4 paper (83 KB, prints out on 4 sheets)

3-view drawings:

PDF for A4 paper


Southern Cross Aviation SC1


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The SC-1 on display at Moorabbin Air Museum in the 1980'sThe SC1 was a prototype for a 4-place trainer or tourer. It first flew in 1962, but never went into production due to competition from imported trainer aircraft.
The sole prototype is now being restored at the Museum of Army Aviation in Oakey, Queensland (on loan from the Australian National Aviation Museum at Moorabbin airport in Melbourne).
My 20.5" span model of the SC-1. Image © Derek BuckmasterThis plan is for a 520mm (20.5") span rubber powered model. The plan prints out on several pages. It includes templates for "do it yourself" printwood.
Plan for 520mm (20.5") model:

PDF for A4 paper (120 KB)

PDF for Letter paper (120 KB)

Yeoman Aviation YA-1 Cropmaster 250 Prototype


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Yeoman Aviation YA-1 Cropmaster 250 prototypeDeveloped from the Wackett trainer, the Cropmaster was a purpose-designed crop duster. This plan is based on the first production YA-1 aircraft, featuring the original wooden Wackett-style empennage.
This plan is for a 610mm (24") span rubber powered model. The plan prints out on 6 pages. All rib and former templates are shown.
Plan for 610mm (24") span model:

PDF for A4 paper (120 KB)

PDF for Letter paper (120 KB)

Yeoman Aviation Yeoman 175 Prototype


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Yeoman Aviation Yeoman 175 prototypeIn order to test a new all-metal empennage for the Cropmaster, Yeoman Aviation modified a single Wackett airframe (VH-AIV) with the new tail unit and canopy design.
This plan is for a 610mm (24") span rubber powered model. The plan prints out on 6 pages. All rib and former templates are shown.
Plan for 610mm (24") span model:

PDF for A4 paper (120 KB)

PDF for Letter paper (120 KB)

Yeoman Aviation YA-1 Cropmaster 250R Series 2


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Yeoman Aviation YA-1 Cropmaster 250R Series 2The Cropmaster went through several developments during its service life, the final version featuring an all-metal wing and all-metal empennage.
This plan is for a 610mm (24") span rubber powered model of the final version. The plan prints out on 6 pages. All rib and former templates are shown.
Plan for 610mm (24") span model:

PDF for A4 paper (120 KB)

PDF for Letter paper (120 KB)


Here are some other plans of aircraft with unique links to Australia:



Avro-Duigan 1911

Avro-Duigan 1911 tractor biplaneIn 1911, John Duigan went to England and ordered a plane from Avro to his own specifications. The result was the Avro-Duigan. Avro subsequently developed this aeroplane into the Avro 500 which was the immediate predecessor of the famous Avro 504.
The plan presented here is for a 635mm (25") span free flight model powered by a KP-01 electric motor.
Plan for 25" span model:

PDF for A4 paper (24KB file)


Taylorcraft Aeroplanes Auster Mk III

Auster Mk III VH-ALS on display at the AAAA fly-in at Woodonga during the 1980s.The Auster Mk III was developed by Taylorcraft Aeroplanes (England) during the Second World War as an observation platform for artillery spotting. It was also adopted for communications roles. Many Mk III aircraft made their way to Australia, and the Mk III was also assembled Down Under.
Auster III model plansThe plans presented are for a 610mm (24") span rubber powered model, with scale framework layout (the balsa parts match up with the steel tube framework of the full size aircraft).
Plans for 610mm (24") model:

PDF for A4 paper (97 KB, prints on 10 sheets)

PDF for Letter Paper
(97 KB, prints on 10 sheets)

Bellanca YO-50


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Bellanca YO-50 imageThe Bellanca YO-50 was developed in the early 1940's as an observation and liason aircraft for the US army. 3 prototypes were built and tested, however the Army opted for smaller, simpler liason aircraft (such as the Piper L-3 and Stinson L-2). So the YO-50 never went into production. It was a large aircraft, designed for high visibility (ie: it was easy to see out of the YO-50) and STOL performance. (This aircraft has no links with Australia. I just liked the look of it, and drew up the plan!)
Plan for 610mm (24") model: 

PDF for A4 paper (221KB file, prints out on 6 pages)

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First created 01/01/2000  -  Last updated 07/01/2012